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Personal Space


During the summer of 2010, I created Personal Space, a column that ran weekly on Jackalope Ranch, the art and culture blog of the Phoenix New Times. In each article, I highlighted a local Phoenician and revealed how they expressed their creativity through their personal living space.



Carrie Wheeler

Haver Home


Ralph Haver's architecture is everywhere in Phoenix, but it doesn't make it less valuable or less cool. Haver homes are a part ofthe city'shistory and help define the post-war era when Phoenix began to grow with leaps and bounds.

In north central Phoenix, just a few blocks away from Marlen Grove --the epicenter of Haver homes -- Carrie Wheeler, freelance journalist and blogger and Jay Wiggins, a.k.a. DJ Funkfinger, live in one of seven Havers in their neighborhood.

With very little renovation required, Carrie and Jay quickly felt at home in their Mid-Century Modern pad.

"We don't want to make our house like a 50's replica but when we get stuff, we try to keep the flavor of the time period," says Carrie." That's the stuff we like anyway, so it's easy."

In addition to having created a comfy 50s-inspired abode, Carrie has cultivated a lush veggie garden. After completing a master gardening class and intensely researching the best way to grow vegetables in the Phoenix climate and soil, her garden is a mini miracle.

To learn more about the steps Carrie took to achieve garden success, check out her blog www.crackinggood.com.



Christoph Kaiser

Idea Icubator


Christoph Kaiser dreams of his home being a hive of creative activity, kind of a bauhaus of downtown Phoenix.

As co-founder (with Hayes McNeil) of plus minus studio and with the help of project manager Anson Chen, Christoph has made an outlet for his creative energy in terms of architecture and furniture design. But for Christoph, that wasn't quite enough. So, he's been working/experimenting with photography, graphic design, logos, corporate branding as well as various other projects on his own.

"I would like for my house to be a kind of incubator for design and also a place where there's high energy and things happening." says Christoph. "I would love for that blur to happen between the rigor of life and the rigor of creating things for life.

Christoph's two-story Garfield District home is more open and spacious than "incubator" might suggest. The extra high ceilings and giant windows of the 103-year-old home let in a ton of natural light, helping to create a tangible sense of space.

But the atmosphere isn't the only reason why he chose to live in the Garfield neighborhood, or Phoenix for that matter. After being away for seven years, Christoph started to feel the pull of home. One reason is because he's a native (yup, there are few of them around), but mainly it's because he believes in the future of Phoenix.

Christoph came back to make a difference in the development of his city, a city he believes is still "in its infancy" and chock full of potential.

"Finally people are saying let's push it, let's make it," says Christoph. "ASU Downtown, the Light Rail, it's all rapidly assisting in getting us to that next level, and it's exciting to be here when that's happening. It's rare that you can be."

The big picture of Phoenix is important to him, but so is the community right outside his front door. A series of block parties, thrown by Christoph and some neighbors have brought the community together and helped to break down some barriers in a District that's had a rough past. "Every demographic that you can imagine was out, getting to know each other," says Christoph. "It was a beautiful thing."

As for the inside of his house, he leans slightly toward minimalism, but still keeps it cozy by mixing older pieces in with new ones, many of which are his own design or part of Series One, plus minus design's first furniture line.

"Not having everything be of the same vintage, but to live in an eclectic mix of objects from different eras ... that's a much richer kind of thing" Christoph says.

When not at home or riding his bike around downtown, you might catch Christoph renovating his 1968 Avion trailer. It'll soon be Royal Avion Cafe, a traveling coffee and snack bar, set to start making the rounds sometime this Fall.



Cyndi Coon

Thrift Store Style


Cyndi Coon and Jeremy Briddell, local artists and teachers, moved to Phoenix from the Midwest in 1997, and they are never going back.

"We love it here," says Cyndi. "There's so much here for us community-wise and I like that it's a big small town."

Shortly after moving to Phoenix for grad school, they bought a 1950s ranch house that they quickly set out to make their own.

"When we moved in, everything was retro 80s," says Cyndi. "It was a real Home Depot nightmare."

Cyndi and Jeremy have since created a space that suits their taste to a T. Everything is well-designed, but with a funky, eclectic twist.

"We definitely have a thrift store aesthetic," says Jeremy. " Having grown up with a love of that style, I think we'll always be out looking for interesting stuff at the junky antique shops."

With the addition of two young daughters to the family, some things must change in the house, but there are certain cherished items that will never be given up. A dining room table purchased from a bar in Omaha, Nebraska while on their honeymoon trip across the country will never be tossed.

"Everything we have tells a story about our lives and this table is one of the symbols of the beginning of our lives together," says Cyndi. "So, we'll never part with it."



Hayes McNeil

Modern Ideal


Le Corbusier, one of the pioneers of modern architecture once declared "a home is a machine for living". Just like the parts of a well-crafted machine, everything that exists within a home should be essential. Anything more was frivolous and downright bourgeois.

For Phoenix architect Hayes McNeil, his home, a duplex in central Phoenix, represents some of the same modernist ideas advocated in the past, efficiency, form following function and the improvement of communities through architecture.

"This house was an experiment," says Hayes." We wanted to see how much we could squeeze in while still being as efficient with materials and energy as possible."

The McNeil home is also an experiment in fluid boundaries. With no doors and few walls, the division of space is more implicit rather than explicit.

"We wanted the house to have implied boundaries, without actually having walls or doors," says Hayes. "In the end, it's about the size. A smaller space will feel bigger and better without walls."

At exactly 1,000 square feet, their home might seem a bit snug by today's standards, but for the McNeils, smaller is better. Not only is it more energy efficient, but Hayes sees smaller homes and duplexes as ideal for creating denser urban spaces that cultivate a sense of brotherly love. By creating duplexes with overlapping spaces, shared courtyards for example, Hayes believes good neighbors are an inevitability.

"A duplex model works well and causes you to be mindful of the way you treat others," says Hayes. "It causes you to be conscious of being part of a community."



Jessica Carroll

Thrift Store Lifestyle


Jessica Carroll knows what she likes and she knows where to find it.

Her home in central Phoenix is a fusion of objects found at various thrift stores or acquired through other less conventional means. Hare Dryer by W.F. Martin, a surrealist folk piece hangs on her wall, a gift from her mom who won it in a school district art auction. But more than the individual pieces, it's the ensemble of crafts and art that make Jessica's home so interesting.

"I like cool, strange things" says Jessica. "Mixing old with new and lots of color."

In addition to teaching art at Desert Foothills Jr. High School, Jessica owns Blueberry Deluxe, a boutique in the Melrose District that sells vintage items, homegrown crafts and clothing. Everything decidedly very Etsy.

She says being creative on a budget is part of the fun, and as a regular thrifter she knows all the cheap hot spots in the area.

"I go to thrift stores three or four times a week," says Jessica. "I like to go out to Prescott or Flagstaff where they tend have more oddball things."

"I'm almost to the point where I know which stores are good for what," she adds. "One [store] has the hipster jackets, the other has cowboy boots, et cetera."

Her local favorite: the Salvation Army on Indian School and Seventh Avenue, (formerly Unique Thrift) where all clothing is $2.

The constant thrift store mining allows Jessica to keep her home continually fresh and evolving. "I think everyone should allow their home to grow," she says. "Buying second hand items allows you to feel good about the process."

When asked if she ever found things to sell in the store but loved too much to part with, she smiles. "Oh yeah, you'll never find a pair of size 10 shoes in the store."



Sarah Spencer

Creative Crib


Sarah Spencer and her husband Erik Nicewarner have a lot going on and most of it happens at home.

Sarah is currently writing her first novel, contributing to several craft project books and guest blogging on various craft and gardening sites such as Mixology Crafts and Xeriscape Today. She's also learning to play the bass and the mandolin.

Erik (too busy to be photographed) owns The Uncarved Block, a building and remodeling company in Phoenix and also blogs about cycling and his projects on The Cyclocontractor. And to not be outdone by his wife -- Erik is learning to play guitar.

With all the creative energy moving around, it's no wonder Sarah and Erik have a low-key space.

Comfort and carefully selected objects are their key homemaking ingredients. And as any good product of an antique-filled childhood, Sarah says she believes in decorating her own space with the spirit of pre-loved objects.

"I love the idea that someone before me owned it and I believe that things take in the spirit of the person who owned it. I think you can tell from looking at a piece, that it's been well cared for and loved." says Sarah.

Eight years ago, Sarah began creating an Eden in her backyard complete with chickens and an Airstream trailer that functions as her craft studio.

"I find the Airstream to be soothing, and at the same time it swirls with energy," says Sarah. "It is, quite literally, the best atmosphere for creativity I have ever experienced."

Check out 26 Letters, Sarah's site to learn more about this crafty chica's projects.



Wizards of Time

The Band Cave


Urban legend has it that The Wizards of Time current jam pad in Tempe has been used by at least four other bands and that one of those bands, Princess Ladyfriend, used to rock out on the roof, much to the delight of their neighbors. The truth may never out, but what we can say with certainty is that this house has some intense musical vibes lingering in the air. (Read more Wizards of Time coverage on our music blog, Up on the Sun.)

And The Wizards of Time are digging it. Although they've chosen the more conventional route of playing indoors.

Since returning from North Carolina where they recorded their latest LP, "Will this soft curse plague on?" (set to be released sometime this Fall), The Wizards of Time have been gradually making this new space feel like home.

Found objects, band artwork, christmas lights and a lamp that has travelled with them to so many shows that they were labelled "Lamp Rock" are all part of a creative work in progress.

"It makes us feel more comfortable just having things that are familiar to us," says bassist Justin Weir. "Maybe we don't realize it at the time, but it does make us feel more creative."

To feel comfortable and inspired is key to any great practice space. More than the concert stage, the rehearsal space is where the real magic happens. It's the place where new ideas are presented and experimentation leads to great music.

In other words, the practice space is sacred.

And in this particular case, The Wizards of Time might be jamming on the most hallowed ground in Tempe.



New Times

New Times


While interning with the Phoenix New Times, I had the opportunity to write, photograph and record various aspects of the local art and culture.




Xoe McAleece

Xoe McAleece

Vintage Mama


Some things in life we have to work hard to make happen, but sometimes, if we're lucky, things just fall into place.

For Xoe McAleece, creating Vintage Mama was a natural extension of something she had already been doing; she designs clothes for real women who want to wear something a little different and want to feel great wearing it. "My goal at the end of the day is to make something for someone that makes them feel at their most beautiful,"says Xoe.

After years of designing clothes for friends and family, Xoe decided to make it official. In 2008, she was inspired by two of her greatest loves, vintage clothes and her 3-year-old daughter Keegan, so she gave her venture the name: Vintage Mama.

"Vintage clothes and fabrics have always inspired me, and now being a mother has inspired me in so many ways," says Xoe. "And the word mama is so 1970s, I just love it."

As a child of a librarian and a nationally-known expert in historic home preservation, Xoe developed an affection for old things early in life.

"I've always loved old things, old books, old houses, old records," says Xoe. "They all have a distinct smell and character that new things just don't have ... and they've been loved by someone else."

Between a steady stream of orders and selling her designs at the Fair Trade Cafe and on Etsy, Vintage Mama is starting to turn into a real self-sustaining business.

Although she resists predicting the future of her company and is just trying to enjoy each new project that comes her way, Xoe concedes: "My ideal situation would be creating as many things as possible for as many people as possible, and if I could live off of it, that would be great, too."



Raw Foods Potluck

Arizona's Raw Foodies Celebrate the Salad Days


Heat got you down? Drink more water. Even more than that.And if you're really serious about feeling better, we've got some tips for a summer detox that will having you feeling better long before temperatures dip back below 100 degrees.

Eat less. Studies show that people who eat less (roughly 10-30 percent less calories ) throughout their lives tend to live longer. Although the exact reasons are still elusive, the evidence is compelling. To read more about a restrictive diet visit www.newscientist.com.

Follow a basic system for eating. The Mediterranean Food Pyramid is a good guide to the correct amounts and variety of foods we should be eating.

Drink water!!! Without sufficient amounts of water (about 8 8oz. cups for the average person) in the body,our organs can't flush out toxins properly and our blood can't transport oxygen as efficiently. For more go to www.mayoclinic.com.De-stress daily. Yoga, hanging with good friends, or playing with your pet are all beneficial in reducing stress. And since it's been proven that stress blocks the healing process both physically and mentally why not take a time out and enjoy some relaxation. To read about the impact of stress on the body go to www.stress-management-for-health.com.

Get enough sleep. Research has shown that adults who continually get less than seven hours of sleep a night have a greater risk of heart attacks, strokes and diabetes. Although every persons sleep needs are different, on average 7 1/2 hours to 9 hours of sleep has been found to be optimal for adults. For more go to www.washingtonpost.com.

Let go. When we let go of old grudges and other forms of negativity, we tend to be happier and current research shows that happy people live longer healthier lives. See www.sciencedaily.com for more on health and happiness.

And now for some simple detoxifying recipes that will help you to get started on the road to a healthier you.

1.Hot lemon water.
Drink this first thing in the morning before doing anything else. Lemon water helps finish the detoxing that's been occurring over night. Pour 8 oz. or hot water over the juice of 1/2 lemon and add a pinch of cayenne pepper.

2. Switch from white processed grains to brown whole grains.
This isn't really a recipe, but the additional fiber will help keep the process of digestion and elimination,ummm, moving along.

Watermelon water
3.Substitute soda or store bought juices with homemade watermelon water. The recipe: 6-8 lbs. of watermelon cut into 2" pieces (seedless works best) 2 Cups of Coconut water ( you can substitute regular drinking water) 1 Tablespoon of Agave Nectar or Honey Blend all ingredients until smooth and enjoy!

Veggie soup
4. Try a light veggie soup instead of a heavier pasta or meat dish. You can make a batch and eat for lunch during the week and they're good both hot and cold. This Summer soup is super easy. 2tbsp Olive oil 2 leeks, cut into 1/2 in. slices 2 stalks of celery cut into 1/2 in. slices 12 asparagus tips coarsely chopped 6 Red potatoes, chopped into bite size pieces 5 cups veggie stock 1 1/4 cup fresh peas (frozen is fine) 3 tbsp. chopped mint 3oz. baby spinach Salt and Pepper to taste Heat oil in a large saucepan, add the leeks and celery and cook gently for 10 mins. (Don't let the leeks brown). Add asparagus and potatoes along with the stock. Bring to a boil and then simmer for 15 mins. Add peas and simmer for 5 more mins. Stir in the mint and spinach, season to taste and voila!

Mint tea
5. Replace desert with fresh mint tea. Mint soothes the digestive tract and it also contains a phytonutrient called perillyl alcohol that has been show to prevent the formation of certain cancers. For more on mint go to health.learninginfo.org. To make the tea, pour hot water over 6-8 mint leaves and allow to steep for 2-3 mins.

6. Consider drinking your lunch. Carrot juice, often called the "miracle juice," contains a multitude of vitamins and minerals all beneficial in the healing and detoxifying process. There are many carrot juice recipes available at www.carrotjuice.com.



See Saw Design

Letterpress Print with See Saw Design


In the age of digital presses where anything can be printed on demand at high speed, it's only natural there's a renewed interest in an old-school technique like Letterpress printing.

The design team at SeeSaw Designs in Scottsdale are not immune to the love of vintage printing, and they've taken the time and energy to find the Letterpresses and all the gear that goes along with it to create beautiful cards and calendars that have that retro feel.

We caught up with Raquel Raney, one of SeeSaw designers to discuss her crush on Letterpress printing and to get a feel for how it's done. "We're still learning as we go and I'm sure we do a lot a little bit backwards," says Raquel. "But, we love it and it's not going anywhere."

For those considering an adventure in Letterpress printing, or who are simply curious about the process, here is a very basic step-by-step guide and a few helpful hints from the team at See Saw Designs.

1. Apprentice for a year or two. Traditionally, printing was considered a serious skill and printers had a ton to learn before they were ready to go it alone. According to Raquel, seven years was a normal length of time to apprentice. Nowadays, most don't have seven years to commit to a Letterpress education and choose to learn as they go. Like the team from SeeSaw Designs prove, it just takes a love of old school printing techniques and the energy to do it yourself.

2. Find your Letterpress printer. There are a variety of letterpresses available, ranging for a very basic starter kit that can be bought new to older models that can be found on ebay or craigslist. Making your own letterpress is also an option.

3. Gather your supplies. The necessities include rollers, ink, paper (tip from Raquel: use 100 percent cotton paper, it's spongy enough to give you a nice impression). And there are plenty of extra supplies required such as exact-o knifes, little paper grips called gauge pins, pencils, rulers, etc.

4. Decide exactly how old school you really want to be. There are old wood and metal blocks of type that you can find around (again ebay and craigslist are your friends), but you might consider going the more modern route. Consider creating your design in Adobe Illustrator, making a vector file and sending it off to be made into a photo-polymer plate. (SeeSaw uses Boxcar Press in Syracuse New York.) And if that seems like a lot of work, just trust that it is, in fact, the simpler solution. Setting tiny letters in the right place is time consuming, and you might risk a headache or two, as the type can be very small.

5. Think upside down. When you begin to block (or set up) your plate, you'll have to do it up upside down so that it turns out, well ... right side up. Raquel says this is one of the hardest things to get used to.

6. Get ready to print. To set up the right alignment, you'll need to prepare the base (the image or letters you're printing) to be "type high," the technical term for making sure everything is the same height. Typman and packing paper allow you to control the level of the impression created by the press. Experimentation in paper thickness is key.

7. Find the perfect placement for the paper and keep the paper in place with the gauge pins. Adjust and adjust again until the print is aligned correctly.

8. Apply ink to the rollers. When it comes to the ink, a little goes a long way. Once you've spread the ink onto to the dispenser, allow the machine to disperse the ink on the round metal plate.

9. And you're off! Once you've got the placement of the paper just right and the press is inked and ready to go, you can start to work pretty quickly.

Extra note: For a multicolor print, the press will have to be cleaned completely in between each new color application.

So, if you haven't yet decided you'd rather just order SeeSaw's cards and skip the whole "do-it-yourself" bit, you might just have a future in the neo-retro niche market of Letterpress printing.



Summertime Detox

Heat got you down? Drink more water. Even more than that.And if you're really serious about feeling better, we've got some tips for a summer detox that will having you feeling better long before temperatures dip back below 100 degrees.

Eat less. Studies show that people who eat less (roughly 10-30 percent less calories ) throughout their lives tend to live longer. Although the exact reasons are still elusive, the evidence is compelling. To read more about a restrictive diet visit www.newscientist.com.

Follow a basic system for eating. The Mediterranean Food Pyramid is a good guide to the correct amounts and variety of foods we should be eating.

Drink water!!! Without sufficient amounts of water (about 8 8oz. cups for the average person) in the body,our organs can't flush out toxins properly and our blood can't transport oxygen as efficiently. For more go to www.mayoclinic.com.De-stress daily. Yoga, hanging with good friends, or playing with your pet are all beneficial in reducing stress. And since it's been proven that stress blocks the healing process both physically and mentally why not take a time out and enjoy some relaxation. To read about the impact of stress on the body go to www.stress-management-for-health.com.

Get enough sleep. Research has shown that adults who continually get less than seven hours of sleep a night have a greater risk of heart attacks, strokes and diabetes. Although every persons sleep needs are different, on average 7 1/2 hours to 9 hours of sleep has been found to be optimal for adults. For more go to www.washingtonpost.com.

Let go. When we let go of old grudges and other forms of negativity, we tend to be happier and current research shows that happy people live longer healthier lives. See www.sciencedaily.com for more on health and happiness.

––

And now for some simple detoxifying recipes that will help you to get started on the road to a healthier you.

1.Hot lemon water–

Drink this first thing in the morning before doing anything else. Lemon water helps finish the detoxing that's been occurring over night. Pour 8 oz. or hot water over the juice of 1/2 lemon and add a pinch of cayenne pepper.

2. Brown whole grains–

Switch from white processed grains to brown whole grains.This isn't really a recipe, but the additional fiber will help keep the process of digestion and elimination,ummm, moving along.

3. Watermelon water–

Substitute soda or store bought juices with homemade watermelon water. The recipe: 6-8 lbs. of watermelon cut into 2" pieces (seedless works best) 2 Cups of Coconut water ( you can substitute regular drinking water) 1 Tablespoon of Agave Nectar or Honey Blend all ingredients until smooth and enjoy!

4. Veggie soup–

Try a light veggie soup instead of a heavier pasta or meat dish. You can make a batch and eat for lunch during the week and they're good both hot and cold. This Summer soup is super easy. 2tbsp Olive oil 2 leeks, cut into 1/2 in. slices 2 stalks of celery cut into 1/2 in. slices 12 asparagus tips coarsely chopped 6 Red potatoes, chopped into bite size pieces 5 cups veggie stock 1 1/4 cup fresh peas (frozen is fine) 3 tbsp. chopped mint 3oz. baby spinach Salt and Pepper to taste Heat oil in a large saucepan, add the leeks and celery and cook gently for 10 mins. (Don't let the leeks brown). Add asparagus and potatoes along with the stock. Bring to a boil and then simmer for 15 mins. Add peas and simmer for 5 more mins. Stir in the mint and spinach, season to taste and voila!

5. Mint tea–

Replace desert with fresh mint tea. Mint soothes the digestive tract and it also contains a phytonutrient called perillyl alcohol that has been show to prevent the formation of certain cancers. For more on mint go to health.learninginfo.org. To make the tea, pour hot water over 6-8 mint leaves and allow to steep for 2-3 mins.

6. Carrot juice–

Consider drinking your lunch. Carrot juice, often called the "miracle juice," contains a multitude of vitamins and minerals all beneficial in the healing and detoxifying process. There are many carrot juice recipes available at www.carrotjuice.com.


Summertime Detox



Susie Clare

Susie Clare's Vintage Collection


Susie Clare, a local artist and art therapy major, fell in love with vintage clothes early in life. Going thrift store shopping as a kid opened her eyes to the creative possibilities in collecting vintage.

"Vintage is great because most of the time when you find a vintage item, no on else has it,"says Susie. "You can be completely unique."

Like most longtime collectors, Susie has found her "niche within a niche" and now focuses her acquisitions on "union-made" items, clothes made by The International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union, what once was one of the most important unions in the United States and the first major union to have mostly women members.

"Union-made dresses are higher quality and because many are handmade they have a greater attention to detail," says Susie.

Dresses from a time when things were made to last and made for ladies who were built to last is definitely part of the appeal. The extinction of the clothes made for a curvy female has not been overlooked by Susie.

"Most of us are not anorexic models. In the 50s, hour glass figures were the norm and it feels good to put on a dress that is meant for a real woman's body."



Jim Malloy

Kickin' It


According to the Urban Dictionary, a Sneakerhead is 1. A person who collects limited, rare, OG, or flat out exclusive kicks. Usually the collection consists of Jordans or Dunks. 2. A person with background knowledge of certain sneakers.

Jim Malloy, half of the creative duo behind Bunky Boutique, is a bona fide Sneakerhead -- a title he'll halfway tolerate. What he won't accept is being called a sneaker expert.

"Expert sounds obnoxious," says Jim. " I think it's like any other subculture, you just get immersed in it."

He will also get embarrassed if you stare too long at his his insane collection of Limited release special edition sneakers, some of which are one of only 200 pairs in the world.

But it is true that he knows more than the average person about fancy sneakers (he has more than 300 pairs). Most are the likes of Nike, Adidas, Puma and Converse and not a single pair are regular ol' kicks. These babies are top of the line, many of them from special stores in China, Japan and Europe. These are the kind of pimp treads collectors scour blogs such as Nice Kicks watching for the next great pair to drop (or be released) and will pay dearly for on secondary market sites like eBay.

Recalling his first crush on a pair of Air Jordan Ones, a gift from his dad at the age of 14, Jim says " I just kind of flipped." Since then, it's been an addiction he can't seem to break.

Sporting chocolate bunnies, luchadores and everything in between these sneakers are size 13 pieces of art. Many behemoth companies such as Nike collaborate with artists, clothing and furniture designers to continually produce sneakers that stay fresh, culturally relevant and highly collectible, keeping connoisseurs like Jim constantly on the look out for the rarest of the rare.

"Its really all about the hunt" says Jim.

Spoken like a true Sneakerhead.



Chef Sara

Chef Sara


Chef Sara Siso is on a mission. Armed with the simplest of weapons, a raw vegan diet, Chef Sara is out to defeat the epidemic of diseases that she sees plaguing our nation, diseases she attributes to SAD, the Standard American Diet.

While many chefs approach food preparation with taste as their first priority, Chef Sara is more concerned with how foods work in our bodies and how we can keep ourselves healthy through adopting a raw vegan lifestyle.

In 1997, while losing a sister to cancer and seeing the ineffectual results of traditional medicine, Chef Sara was compelled to learn about alternative methods of treating disease. Her quest led her to the Hippocrates health Institute in West Palm Beach, Florida where she learned about the medicinal properties of food and the pluses of proper food combining.

Now, through the various programs she offers, Chef Sara helps people to find the healing power in food, mainly fruits and vegetables, what she calls "nature's medicine chest". Her website, Chef Sara Signature Creations is an informational powerhouse on what a plant based diet can do for us and how delicious it can truly be. She is currently working on a series of cookbooks that will provide the benefits of ingredients alongside the recipes. Chef Sara wants us to not only enjoy the flavors of food, but also the peace of mind that comes with doing something that we know is good for us.

We had the opportunity to sit down with Chef Sara and talk about her raw foods mission.

Do you feel like you've had a calling to heal people?

Yes, I do. Seeing the changes in others that have been heeled is so rewarding. Clients come to me with asthma, allergies, stress, diabetes, cancer, all kinds of diseases and I can see the difference in them after working with them. It's so overwhelming to see how I've been able to impact people's lives. What can be more rewarding than saving lives.

Do you think a raw foods diet would have caught on 15 or 20 years ago? Or have we evolved and become more sophisticated in our knowledge of foods and therefore, it works?

Raw food has been existing for many many years, but now, because of the epidemic of diseases we are encountering from all the processing of foods and pesticides and the poison that is out there, people are forced to look for alternatives. People are so sick and desperate for something to work. The answers aren't coming through traditional medicine and people realize they need to look down different avenues. Slowly slowly raw vegan is becoming more popular. When you see raw vegan, people they don't have diseases and it's proof that a raw vegan diet works. It's still a baby, but it will be a huge thing.

Has there been an increase in demand for the kind of conscientious eating you are promoting?

Oh yeah, big time.

With all the raw food chefs out there, what makes you stand out?

It really is my knowledge of food combining that I got from studying at the Hippocrates Health Institute. A lot of chefs out there really don't know how to combine foods properly. Also, I am more concerned with making sick people well again, rather than being out there preparing food all day long. So, it's different.

What is your opinion on vitamins?

You might as well take your money and flush it down the toilet. You're wasting money. You have all the vitamins you need in the food if you eat a raw vegan diet. It's all there, alive in the food.

––

(Part 2)

Growing up in Israel, Chef Sara had a head start on a healthy lifestyle. The traditional Israeli diet is chock full of fruits and vegetables. Although much of what she ate then, she wouldn't touch now, she still has a sense of gratitude for the diet she grew up with.

"It was a good beginning. It was healthy. And when you ate a chicken, it was a real chicken, from a farm, without hormones or antibiotics," Chef Sara states.

Years later, after moving to the United States and settling in Florida and then Arizona, Chef Sara again encountered cancer, only this time it was her own diagnosis. Without wasting time, she set out to cure herself through her diet. In one months time, to her doctors amazement, the tumor had disappeared. It was at that moment that Chef Sara decided to create a program that could provide healing and health management to others on an affordable scale. And it only takes going to her website and read the multitude of heartfelt testimonials to know that her work is appreciated.

I feel like our conversation has been kind of heavy so far, so let's lighten it up for a moment. If you were stranded on a deserted island, what would be the one food you would want to have?

That is very easy to answer. Wheatgrass. Wheatgrass is amazing. I would chew on it 'til the cows come home and it would keep me alive and give me everything I need.

Do you make wheatgrass juice at home?

Yes, every day. I do it here at home with a masticating juicer.

Would you ever open a restaurant?

You know, people ask me, beg me all the time, "please, please open a restaurant", and I keep saying no only because it's so much work. But I hate to say absolutely no because you never know. Maybe one day I'll change my mind. Maybe I will be in the right place at the right time and I'll see the cutest place that would be the perfect spot. It may happen. I actually looked at a place recently that I think would really work, and I know it would be successful. In California there are a lot of raw food restaurants, but nowhere in Phoenix is there a raw vegan restaurant.

Any recommendations for people who want to try a raw foods diet but are on a budget?

The way I look at it it's not expensive. If you know where to go, you can buy cheap and live cheap. Number one: Shop at a farmer's market. You'll be getting local and you'll be getting organic. When products come from out of state they are automatically sprayed with pesticides. So even if it's grown organic in California or Mexico, by the time it gets to the Arizona market, it's been sprayed. It's always cheaper to buy at the farmer's market and there is a farmer's market somewhere in Phoenix everyday of the week.

And the Raw Foods diet is cheaper than buying meat, cheese, fish or chicken. It's cheaper than going to the doctors. I don't have health insurance, I don't want it. The money I'm saving on insurance, the money I'm saving on not going to doctors, the money I'm saving by not buying animal products goes into fruits and vegetables, grains and nuts. It's all in the knowledge and how you choose to look at your health and lifestyle.

And finally, what was your favorite food growing up?

Fresh figs. They're hard to find here, but in Israel they grow everywhere. Yes, fresh figs, definitely.



Jonathan Vallo

Jonathan Vallo


Equal parts Anthropologie and old Hollywood movie set, The Duce is an ambitious attempt at recreating an entire city neighborhood. Think New York or Chicago in the 1940's.

Complete with news stand, soda fountain, coffee bar, organic grocery market, various other retail nooks and perhaps most important a restaurant and bar, The Duce is a throwback to "the good ol' days" when mom and pop stores reigned. The pre-Walmart era. A time we are all nostalgic for whether we've ever really experience it or not.

Like many new to Phoenix summers, The Duce has decided to lay low with limited hours, Thursday thru Sunday, but plans on being open full time come fall.

Originally, Jonathan Vallo(a.k.a.JV)came to Phoenix to finish his Mechanical Engineering degree, but found that his love for food led him in another direction and found himself in the kitchen at La Grande Orange before The Duce made him an offer he couldn't refuse.

Having grown up in Cleveland, Ohio, Jonathan feels right at home in the vintage world Steve and Andi Rosenstein have created. He also digs the Duce's mission of re- creating a strong community in downtown Phoenix.
"The overriding idea for the space is a community neighborhood all under one roof" says Jonathan. "We've even set up the tables to give it a neighborly kind of feel where you might be sitting with people you don't know and it let's you get to know them, if you like."

Thoughts on Phoenix I moved here in 2004 for a change of scenery. I wanted to come out here, finish school and get out of the cloudiness that is Cleveland. Since then I've been waiting for Phoenix to evolve into the city I know it can be.

Thoughts on Downtown It has a lot of potential. Some of it has already started to come together, like around Matt's Big Breakfast or Grand Avenue. I'm excited to see it evolve.

As far as where we're located, it's pretty low key. Theres not a whole lot going on down here but I think having us as a neighbor might help bring some life into the area. There is certainly the space for a ton of stuff, restaurants, nightlife, etc.

Inspiration for the menu Andy and Steve's family recipes. Stuff they grew up with. The brisket the meatballs, the different deserts, the kugel, it's all their family recipes and things they've grown up with. We are all about good wholesome feel-good food.

Favorite Item on the menu The Brisket Sliders. It's a slow cooked brisket, we roast it for about 5-6 hours. It's amazingly tender and full of flavor.

(Part 2)

One important thing to know about Jonathan Vallo- he's a bit of a mystery. After hearing him say many times that he's gone by different names and really likes to "lay low", I started to wonder if he might be on the lam. When I asked, I think he mumbled something about student loans, but I'm not quite sure.

But all of that changes when we get to talking about The Duce and its menu. It's apparent that Jonathanis happy to be head cook at The Duce -- specializing in "endangered recipes." He also loves the idea of a restaurant that is all organic, yet completely committed to American comfort food.

When did you know you were a foodie? I've always had an inquisitive nature and I've always loved food. But right after High School I worked at the training camp for the Cleveland Browns and it was a cool vibe. They taught me everything and really took me under their wing. I've always been a big fan of trying new things. But I still don't think of myself as a foodie.

Thoughts on the Phoenix food scene It's good. I would love to see more ethnically-inspired fare. Or perhaps a homegrown food style. I would like to see more international ecclectic fare. I think when people come to Phoenix they're used to seeing Southwestern food, but I would love to see us create a food scene that is on par with L.A. or New York. More creative concepts would be awesome.

In the fridge as we speak Tuna Steak, milk chocolate, condiments. A pretty full fridge. I'm sure I've got a beer or two in there, too.

Favorite local Spot The Lost Leaf. It's got a really good vibe. The place is just a great down-to-earth place. I'll usually go on Sunday nights when they have a jazz band.

Next Food Stop Green in Tempe or maybe, The Parlour.

Plans for a Sock Hop Maybe in the Fall. That would actually be pretty cool.

The best food thing ever Our S'mores cheescake. It's chocolately and light, rich, but not too rich. It's difficult to enjoy cheesecake in three digit weather, but somehow I still do.



News

News


In the Spring of 2011, I reported on the Arizona State Legislature for Cronkite News, a wire service providing stories to a number of news outlets throughout the state of Arizona. In particular, I focused on transportation and the environment.




Rainwater Harvesting


Lawmaker Proposes Study of Rainwater Harvesting’s Potential in Arizona


PHOENIX – When rain hits the roof of Greg Peterson’s home, almost half flows directly into a giant cistern to be used to water his garden and most of the rest goes into an underground pipe carrying it to his fruit trees. What remains pours onto trees placed strategically beneath the eaves.

Peterson uses these rainwater harvesting systems in order to live and promote an environmentally conscious lifestyle. But a lower water bill is a nice benefit.

“I’m fully in support of rainwater harvesting,” Peterson said. “It’s the best way for individuals to water their yards.”

The process of collecting rainwater is nothing new; people have done it for generations. But if one lawmaker has his way, harvested rainwater may eventually be recognized and regulated as an official water source.

Sen. Steve Pierce, R-Prescott, authored a bill calling for a committee to study the impact of large-scale rainwater harvesting on current water sources, including the aquifers and surface water, as well as the environment.

SB 1522 involves what it calls macro-rainwater harvesting, which rather than collecting water from the roofs of homes would involve large projects to collect rainfall.

Pierce and supporters of the bill hope that the study would prove that macro-rainwater harvesting would help overcome annual water deficits that parts of Arizona experience.

Yavapai County Supervisor Carol Springer, who helped generate the legislation, said macro-rainwater harvesting has immense potential for the future of Arizona.

“The rainwater is a resource that is being wasted and it’s a renewable resource,” Springer said. “There are many places in the state where this problem exists – mainly rural – that don’t have access to surface water rights.”

Pierce’s original bill, which won Senate approval, would have required the Arizona Department of Water Resources to create rules and regulations for large-scale rainwater collection. The bill would provide a credit allowing those who use harvested rainwater to recharge aquifers to pump out half of what they put in.

The bill was amended in the House to call for a study by a committee consisting of both House and Senate members and other stakeholders to more fully understand the impact of large-scale rainwater harvesting on aquifers as well as surface water supplies. If the measure clears the House, the Senate would have to concur with the change or resolve the differences in a conference committee.

Sandra Fabritz-Whitney, acting director of Arizona Department of Water Resources, said that the study would be a fair and necessary first step in the process.

“We are not opposed to the idea, but we need to understand the impact and if it has possible detrimental impact on water users,” Fabritz-Whitney said. “The study is a compromise, and we’re fine with that.”

It’s no coincidence that the main architects of the bill are from Prescott, where the long-term health of the aquifer is a concern. The Arizona Department of Water Resources would like to see the Prescott Active Management Area remove no more groundwater than is recharged by 2025.

Doug McMillan, a senior project manager at Civiltec, a Prescott engineering firm, said the ADWR goal could easily be met by capturing a mere 3 percent of the rain that falls each year. Based on his research, 98 percent of rainwater is lost to evaporation and transpiration, leaving only 2 percent to reach the aquifer. McMillan said recharging the aquifer through macro-rainwater harvesting could be a win-win situation.

“We need more water going into the aquifer, and this could do that,” McMillan said. “It could also lessen the burden on the Verde River, which in turn protects the wildlife that depend on that river.”

Springer said she’s confident that rainwater harvesting can solve Prescott’s water challenges without dramatically affecting natural processes.

“This is a small percentage of rainwater we’re proposing,” Springer said. “Most of the rainwater will go where it’s always gone, into the ground, lost through evaporation, or go to the plants.”

But according to Bruce Hallin, manager of water rights and contracts at Salt River Project, the science behind the concept isn’t as sound as it needs to be.

“There are a lot of unknowns and unproven science,” Hallin said. “From our perspective more analysis is necessary to determine what is true and good science.”

In addition to a potential impact on the aquifer, Hallin said he’s concerned about the consequences of collecting rain before it reaches surface streams, potentially taking away water belonging to users down river.

Springer and McMillan said the proposed time frame is long enough and that the time has come for such a study.

“When most people turn on their taps, they don’t think about where that water comes from, and we can’t wait until the tap is dry to find a solution,” McMillan said. “We need to be looking generations ahead.”



Ocelot Sighting


Experts: Recent Ocelot Sightings in Arizona Good News for Species


PHOENIX – Two confirmed sightings of ocelots in Arizona during the past year bode well for the endangered species’ future here, a biologist said.

“This is really exciting news,” said Sergio Avila of the Sky Island Alliance, an environmental group in southern Arizona. “These cats are telling us something important, and what they’re telling us is that Arizona is a good place for ocelots.”

The latest sighting occurred Tuesday morning at a home in the Huachuca Mountains of southern Arizona. The report was confirmed by the Arizona Game and Fish Department after the young male cat was observed by a wildlife management officer, according to Jim Paxon, a department spokesman.

The ocelot, traditionally a tropical cat with a natural habitat spanning from the Mexican lowlands to central South America, was designated an endangered species in 1972. There’s only one known population in the U.S., a colony of 25 cats in southwestern Texas.

Tuesday’s sighting was the first live ocelot confirmed in Arizona since 1964. In April 2010, an ocelot was struck and killed by a vehicle near Globe.

Melanie Culver, U.S. Geological Survey geneticist and member of the the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Ocelot Recovery Team, said experts suspect the latest sightings are evidence of wandering males rather than a breeding population in the state.

“I don’t think this ocelot was born here,” Culver said. “In my opinion, it most likely came from Mexico and had to cross the border.”

But according to Avila, who has collected roughly 50 motion-triggered photos of ocelots just 30 miles south of the U.S.-Mexico border, there could be a breeding population of ocelots that just hasn’t been spotted.

“The theory is that these are males traveling in search of new territory, but we just don’t know for sure,” Avila said. “They are extremely secretive, and it’s a fluke when we are able to spot one.”

Although the Arizona Game and Fish Department has no current plans to track the ocelot population, this recent sighting might create an interest in a possible study, Paxon said.

After an incident in which 2009 an adult male jaguar, dubbed Macho B, died after being captured, collared with a tracking device and released, department officials are adamant that they observe official protocols set down by the Endangered Species Act.

“The trapping of Macho B was an unfortunate accident,” Paxon said.

While Macho B was 16 years old, which is quite old for a jaguar, the ocelot sighted Tuesday appeared young and healthy, Paxon said, and a decision was made early on to leave him alone.

“He was very nonplussed by the situation; he was relaxed and licking his paws,” Paxon said. “And after a while he just went his own way.”



Prescott College Bicycle Class


Class Studies How Bicycling Benefits Society as well
as Health


PRESCOTT – On a Friday afternoon, Erika DeLeo is taking apart an old bike, scrubbing the rusty chain and oiling the ball bearings and thinking about how it’s going to go back together.

She could be any other student working at the HUB, the do-it-yourself bicycle shop at Prescott College, but actually she’s in class.

DeLeo is one of nearly a dozen students enrolled in The Bicycle: Vehicle for Social Change, a class that teaches social change on the most personal level: by refurbishing old bikes for people in need of transportation.

“Originally, I was interested in this class to learn about the mechanics of bicycles,” DeLeo said. “Then I discovered that half of the class was about social change, and I thought that would be something I would definitely be in to.”

Sue Knaup, founder of the international bicycle advocacy organization OneStreet and the class instructor, has changed the course over the past two years from being primarily about safe biking practices and bicycle repair into a course with a strong lesson about the power individuals have to create a positive change in their communities and the world.

This month, as part of that lesson, Knaup and a handful of students will travel to Amsterdam and Seville, Spain, two cities that have embraced bicycling and demonstrated their support through campaigns and citywide policy changes.

“It’s important that students learn safe bicycling practices, how to repair bikes and help other to bike more safely,” Knaup said. “But I also want students to learn the science of social change through advocating bicycling and why bicycles can be a vehicle social change.”

The group will spend two days in Amsterdam, where they will meet with Fietsersbond, the local bicycling advocacy organization for The Netherlands, as well as policy makers who will share some of the steps they’ve taken over the last several decades to transform the city’s transportation system.

Currently, according to Knaup, Amsterdam is one of the world’s top bicycling cities with roughly 50 percent of all trips made by bicycle.

“I want the students to go to Amsterdam to see what a city with healthy transportation options looks like,” Knaup said. “And I want them to experience what it’s like to ride in that swarm of bikes.”

The group then will travel to Seville for the annual Velo City Conference, an international gathering, where they will meet with bicycling advocates from around the world and learn how they’ve approached bicycling in their cities and nations.

Seville was chosen to host the 2011 conference in part because of the changes it has made in increasing its bicycling footprint over the last three years.

“Seville is a great example for Prescott, because we can see the steps they took to create the most extraordinary leap from less than 1 percent of trips made on bike to 6 percent,” Knaup said. “Amsterdam seems like an impossible goal, but Seville is encouraging because we can see how the change happened.”

Taylor Kuyk-White, a Prescott College senior going on the trip, said she was drawn to the course because bicycling has been her main source of transportation. She said the opportunity to see bicycle-friendly Amsterdam is exciting.

“I’ve never lived in a place that’s been bicycle friendly at all, so I’m really excited to experience that,” Kuyk-White said. “Just the experience of it will be a great motivational tool for implementing change here in Prescott.”

Kuyk-White said the Velo City Conference is the ideal opportunity to be exposed to a broad array of perspectives and tactics that have been used successfully to unite communities.

“This trip is about scoping out methods that people who have experience using the bicycle as a tool for change approach their communities and how to make policy changes,” Kuyk-White said.

Knaup said Prescott has a long way to go before it’s a bicycle-friendly city, complete with sidewalks that connect and bicycle lanes, as well as other forms of public transportation. But Knaup says it’s certainly not impossible.

“My dream for Prescott is that it finally becomes a healthy city were every citizen has the opportunity to choose bicycling or to just go for a stroll without fearing for their lives,” Knaup said. “I hope that’s not too much to ask.”

For Erika DeLeo, it’s no one’s fault that Prescott doesn’t have healthier forms of transportation, but that doesn’t change the fact that changes need to be made to make sure everyone can be safe on the road and have access to transportation.

“I’m not angry with drivers or how unsafe the roads are, but I would love to see Prescott turn into a city like Copenhagen or Amsterdam and become much more bicycle friendly,” she said.



The Boneyard


Historic American Military Aircraft Find New Life at the ‘Boneyard’ in Tucson


TUCSON – At the “Boneyard,” row upon row of B-52s, F-4 Phantoms, A-10 Warthogs and some of the rarest military aircraft dating back to World War II provide a panoramic vision of aviation history.

But there is more to the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group than storing mothballed aircraft on this site adjacent to Davis-Monthan AFB.

The operation cares for older fighter jets, some of which may end up as the nemesis in practice dogfights with newer jets. It also rejuvenates aircraft and reclaims parts, a service that brought in $557 million in 2010.

“We have a very diverse mission,” said Col. Patrick T. Kumashiro, who commands the facility.

When the facility was established in April 1946, its priority was simply offering a place to store old cargo planes and WWII bombers. Due to the dry climate and the clay-like subsoil that could support the weight of planes, Tucson turned out to be an ideal location.

The mission remained the same when Eddie Romero began working here as a civilian 26 years ago.

“It was a much smaller operation back then, he said. “They would just drop us out in the desert to work all day and we’d be out there with the coyotes.”

In many ways, the “Boneyard” and its growing mission are examples of how the military is taking steps to conserve resources, recycle materials and save money. According to Kumashiro, finding ways to stretch taxpayer dollars is part of the Air Force’s responsibility in the current economic climate.

One example is in the A-10 Wing Shop, where old or damaged wings of A-10C aircraft are replaced or repaired. Henry W. “Tank” Thomas Jr., a civilian worker, is the only person with the Air Force who removes old parts of ballistic foam from damaged wings and either builds new parts or adds to the old ones. Because of his specialized position, the base saves nearly $65,000 for each wing that is refurbished.

“This is a one-of-a-kind job that we do here at Davis-Monthan AFB,” Thomas said. “All other USAF bases that have A-10C aircraft order their foam pieces through the GSA (U.S. General Services Administration) supply system.”

As important as cost-saving measures are to those working here, it’s the spectacle of rare and historic aircraft that keeps tourists coming day in and day out. Every year between 25,000 and 30,000 visitors tour the “Boneyard.”

A stretch of road known as Celebrity Row displays some of the most significant aircraft in U.S history, including the YC-14, a prototype cargo plane designed to replace the C-130 Hercules, and the F-100 Super Sabre, the first U.S. Air Force aircraft to break the sound barrier.

Even for those who see it every day, the “Boneyard” continues to impress. Jeffrey Gammel, a longtime civilian employee, is still amazed when he comes to work and sees a C-5 Galaxy, one of the largest military aircraft in the world, being parked.

“Sometimes, you’ll be driving in and you’ll see the big C-5s come in and get rolled over the freeway and it’s a pretty cool sight,” Gammel said. “Yeah, I’ve always liked my job here.”



Booster Seats in Arizona


Lawmaker Gives Booster Seat Bill Second Chance Despite Opposition


PHOENIX – For 15 years, the National Transportation Safety Board has urged states to pass laws requiring children to ride in booster seats up to age 8 or until they are 4 feet 9 inches tall.

But Arizona remains one of three states that doesn’t require the use of booster seats, as bills have repeatedly failed at the state Legislature. Current Arizona law requires child restraints until age 5.

This legislative session promised more of the same, with the latest bill, sponsored by Sens. Linda Gray, R-Phoenix, and Al Melvin, R-Tucson, bottled up in the Senate. But now Rep. Vic Williams, R-Tucson, has revived the proposal in a bill up for consideration Thursday by the House Transportation Committee.

“It doesn’t make sense the way our laws are right now,” Williams said. “There is a gap in our statues that is leaving children unprotected.”

The proposal, contained in a strike-everything amendment to HB 2452, which dealt with another subject, would require drivers of vehicles designed for 10 or fewer passengers to put children in booster seats if they are at least 5 years old and until they are 8 or at least 4 feet 9 inches tall.

The measure would exempt vehicles manufactured before 1972 or that aren’t required to have integrated lap and shoulder belts or lap belts.

SB 1084, the bill offered by Gray and Melvin, wasn’t going to be heard by the Senate Committee on Natural Resources and Transportation, the sponsors said.

“Certain people who are opposed to this bill say it’s creating a ‘nanny state’; they believe it’s an intrusion of their personal rights,” Melvin said. “But I’m interested in saving lives, the lives of young children.”

Michelle Donati, a spokeswoman for AAA Arizona, she said kids under the height of 4 feet 9 inches are simply too small for adult-size seat belts.

“When children are too small for a seat belt and they are in a crash, they can slide under the seat belt or the seat belt itself can cause extreme injury,” Donati said.

While opponents insist that it’s not the responsibility of the government to enforce parenting, Donati said, a AAA public opinion poll found that 92 percent of parents said states have an obligation to enforce safety measures to protect children who aren’t able to protect themselves.

“Parents look to laws for guidance for what they should do to protect their children,” she said. “Many parents are unknowingly putting their children in harm’s way because they follow the law, and currently there is a loophole in the law.”

Gray said her main objective is spreading the word that booster seats save lives.

“The more that can be written about the issue the better,” she said.

Stephanie Davis, a spokeswoman for the NTSB, said that in previous years another point of opposition has been imposing the cost of booster seats on families. But she said there are booster seats within everyone’s budget.

“A booster seat can cost as little as $20,” Davis said. “You don’t need to have the fancy schmancy brand to make your child safer.”

At a recent car seat check held at Cardon Children’s Medical Center in Mesa, Tracey Fejt, injury-prevention specialist for Banner Health, said the safest place for a child who has graduated from a car seat is a booster seat.

“The No. 1 killer of our children is motor vehicle crashes,” Fejt said. “A lot of parents don’t realize that cars were made for adults, they were never ever intended for children.”



Radio

Radio


Working for the Blaze 1330 AM, I generated ideas for stories and reported and produced radio packages each week.




Revolver Records

Revolver Records


Vinyl sales have been on the rise for three years now. Local record shop owner TJ Jordan talks about his love of records and his decision to open his own business, Revolver Records.



Video

FamilyChristopher PlentywoundsDavid Eric FranksRich HalversonArcosantiXoe McAleece

Video


My love of visual storytelling has found it's home in video. I have discovered that video, over all other mediums, has the potential to create the greatest impact on the viewer.



Medical Marijuana: David "Crush" Estrada

Medical Marijuana:
David "Crush" Estrada


In the Spring of 2011, I worked with a team of journalists covering the passing of Proposition 203, the legalization of Medical Marijuana in the state of Arizona.

In this series, I researched, interviewed, filmed, and edited three videos on potential patients. I also had the great honor of working under the direct mentorship of Brian Storm, founder of Media Storm.

This project has been the most rewarding of my career thus far because it makes a strong statement about our ability to show compassion to those in need and aims to challenge the misconceptions surrounding medical marijuana use.

(Click on this link to see the video in HD at Vimeo:
)


Medical Marijuana: David "Crush" Estrada

Medical Marijuana: Rich Halverson

Medical Marijuana:
Rich Halverson


In the Spring of 2011, I worked with a team of journalists covering the passing of Proposition 203, the legalization of Medical Marijuana in the state of Arizona.

In this series, I researched, interviewed, filmed, and edited three videos on potential patients. I also had the great honor of working under the direct mentorship of Brian Storm, founder of Media Storm.

This project has been the most rewarding of my career thus far because it makes a strong statement about our ability to show compassion to those in need and aims to challenge the misconceptions surrounding medical marijuana use.

(Click on this link to see the video in HD at Vimeo:
)


Medical Marijuana: Rich Halverson

Medical Marijuana: Eric Franks

Medical Marijuana:
Eric Franks


In the Spring of 2011, I worked with a team of journalists covering the passing of Proposition 203, the legalization of Medical Marijuana in the state of Arizona.

In this series, I researched, interviewed, filmed, and edited three videos on potential patients. I also had the great honor of working under the direct mentorship of Brian Storm, founder of Media Storm.

This project has been the most rewarding of my career thus far because it makes a strong statement about our ability to show compassion to those in need and aims to challenge the misconceptions surrounding medical marijuana use.

(Click on this link to see the video in HD at Vimeo:
)


Medical Marijuana: Eric Franks

Hidden Homelessness: Christopher Plentywounds

Hidden Homelessness:
Christopher Plentywounds


Homeless families and youth have historically been overlooked by society, mainly because most live in shelters rather than on the streets and therefore go unseen.

Nevertheless, family and youth homelessness is on the rise. And in Phoenix, the numbers are much higher than the national average.

In the Spring of 2010, I profiled two of Phoenix's hidden homeless and one organization that is working to make a difference for families and youth who find themselves without a place to call home.



Hidden Homelessness: Monnarez Family

Hidden Homelessness:
The Monnarez Family


Homeless families and youth have historically been overlooked by society, mainly because most live in shelters rather than on the streets and therefore go unseen.

Nevertheless, family and youth homelessness is on the rise. And in Phoenix, the numbers are much higher than the national average.

In the Spring of 2010, I profiled two of Phoenix's hidden homeless and one organization that is working to make a difference for families and youth who find themselves without a place to call home.



Vintage Mama

Vintage Mama


It takes guts to not be swayed by the ebb and flow of fashion especially when you're a fashion designer, but that's exactly what Xoe MacAleece is striving to achieve. Xoe seeks to design clothes using vintage materials that will make the woman wearing them feel comfortable and of course, fabulous.



Arcosanti

Arcosanti


Arcosanti is Paolo Soleris' vision of a sustainable city. Built on the open landscape of central Arizona, Arcosanti is an example of how people can live harmoniously with nature.



Flash

Flash


Over the last few years I have enhanced my journalism with creative elements. When possible, I enjoy accenting my stories with visual media such as Flash.



Talking in Code

Talking In Code


To enhance an in-depth story on the contributions of Navajo Code Talkers during World War II, I created this interactive timeline showing the evolution of the Code Talker mission.

(Move mouse over radiowaves to recieve transmission)



The Boneyard

Welcome to the Boneyard


The Boneyard at Davis-Monthan AFB in Tucson, Arizona is the largest storage facility for decomissioned aircraft in the world. This interactive map shows some of the most unique planes "mothballed" at the Boneyard.

(Click on the planes to learn about aircraft retired at the Boneyard)



Layout

I've always had a great love for magazines and in particular the various artistic choices in their layout. Working with InDesign has allowed me to create stories the way I feel they should be seen.


Design Layout




Modern Ideal



Haver Hive



Contact

Contact me at spring@eselgroth.com or (480) 862-0780.




Resume


Contact me at spring@eselgroth.com or (480) 862-0780.


download resume